What is Outpatient Alcohol Addiction Treatment and What are Fellowship Support Groups?

If you are struggling with addiction but are ready to get your life back on track, you will probably be interested to know what your treatment options are. You will be pleased to know that there is plenty of choice here in the UK in terms of both inpatient and outpatient programmes. If your addiction is not severe and you are keen to recover while going about daily life, an outpatient programme might be the perfect choice for you. But what is outpatient addiction treatment? Moreover, what does it involve and how can you access it? These are questions we will look at in this article.

What to Expect from Outpatient Treatment?

If you have been wondering what outpatient addiction treatment is, we should tell you that it is regularly provided free of charge by the NHS, charities, and local support groups. You can also access local private counsellors, but you will be expected to cover the cost yourself.

While outpatient programmes vary widely depending on the provider, they are in general much less intensive than inpatient programmes. As you will attend far fewer treatment hours per week, you can expect the duration of an outpatient programme to be much longer than an inpatient programme.

You will not spend the night in the clinic but will instead attend regular treatments with a counsellor or therapist and return home after each session. Outpatient programmes are therefore ideal for those with commitments at home or work.

What Happens During Outpatient Treatment?

Ideally, an outpatient programme will begin once you are clean and sober, meaning you will need to complete a detox before you start. You need to have a clear mind and body as you will find it hard to concentrate on your recovery programme otherwise.

Before starting on a programme of outpatient treatment, you will be given an assessment or evaluation, which will include an interview, to find out more about your current situation, your history of substance use, and whether you have ever tried to quit before.

You might be given a physical examination by a doctor to determine if you have any illnesses related to your substance use. This could include things like a urine and blood tests.

Once accepted, you can expect your outpatient treatment programme to comprise:

  • regular meetings with a doctor
  • regular counselling and therapy sessions either on a one-to-one basis or in a group setting
  • regular urine testing to ensure you are staying clean and sober
  • recovery materials that will help you gain a greater understanding of your illness
  • an introduction to fellowship support groups such as AA or NA.

What Are Fellowship Support Groups?

Fellowship support groups have been helping individuals to overcome addictions to mood-altering substances such as alcohol and drugs for decades. Since Alcoholics Anonymous was established in the early 1930s, these groups have evolved and been adapted for various substance addictions and behavioural disorders.

The basic principle of fellowship support groups is that addiction can be overcome and sobriety maintained with regular meetings, where stories and experiences are shared among members.

Fellowships support groups follow the twelve steps, specifically adapted depending on the organisation. These steps are split into three groups – the decision steps, the action steps, and the maintenance steps.

Working through the twelve steps is not a requirement, although it will help you to get more from the programme. Furthermore, when you consider that AA alone has helped millions of people to overcome their addiction in the years since its inception, it is clear to see that following the steps works. Consider also the fact that the basic principle of AA has been adapted to various other substances such as various drugs and related substances, and behavioural issues such as gambling and sex addictions. This proves that as a method of addiction recovery fellowship support groups work.

What to Expect from Fellowship Support Groups

The question of ‘what is outpatient addiction treatment?’ is one that is commonly asked, but many individuals do not realise that fellowship support groups can be a key part of outpatient recovery. In fact, not including a fellowship support programme in your recovery could increase your chances of a relapse at a later date. Some people manage to get sober with a 12-step programme and nothing else, whereas others will incorporate it into a comprehensive recovery programme.

With so many positive reasons to get involved in a fellowship support group, there are still many individuals who prefer not to join one. This often has to do with the fact that they have misconceptions about these groups.

For example, many people believe that you must belong to a particular religion to join the likes of AA or NA. Others are afraid that they will be put on show and made to stand up and speak about their innermost secrets at their very first meeting. This is not the case.

Mutual support groups are not affiliated with any particular religion. In fact, you do not have to be religious at all to join one. This misunderstanding stems from some of the twelve steps that do refer to God or a Higher Power. The reality is that God can be whatever you define it to be and your Higher Power can be anything that you believe is helping you to get sober and stay that way. You might believe in a greater force or perhaps it is the love you feel for your family that is propelling you towards a successful outcome.

In terms of having to stand up and be on show, this is incorrect also. Nobody will ever force you to talk at a fellowship support meeting if you are uncomfortable doing so. You might be asked to introduce yourself, but you can choose to pass if you wish.

You can simply attend and listen to what others have to say. You will probably find that you can relate to much of what is being said. You can learn from the mistakes of others as well as get helpful advice on how to progress in recovery.

What Will a Fellowship Support Group Mean for You?

If you decide to incorporate a fellowship support group into your recovery programme, you will see many benefits. You will have a place where you can go to meet other recovering addicts. With all members at different stages of their recovery journeys, you will have the opportunity to see what is possible if you stick with it. As you progress through your journey, you will see how far you have come when new members join.

Fellowship groups are supportive environments where you will not have to fear recrimination or judgement and where you can be completely open and honest with yourself and others. Members will be from all walks of life. Some will be just like you and have similar backgrounds, whereas you might not have anything other than addiction in common with others. You will have the chance to make new friendships and you may get to the point where you see your group as a second family.

Fellowship meetings will give you the chance to learn more about how to live successfully in recovery and will be a place of comfort and support whenever you need it. You can get involved with activities and socialise with other members without the worry of chemical substances.

How to Access Outpatient Addiction Treatment?

With so many options for outpatient addiction treatment, you might be feeling a bit overwhelmed. Don’t be though – you can access fellowship support groups within your local community and your doctor will be able to give you information.

You can also get in touch with us here at Primrose Lodge for information about fellowship groups and how to access them or for information on our programmes. We will answer any queries that you may have about addiction and how to overcome it. Call today to find out how we can help you.

If you are struggling with addiction but are ready to get your life back on track, you will probably be interested to know what your treatment options are. You will be pleased to know that there is plenty of choice here in the UK in terms of both inpatient and outpatient programmes. If your addiction is not severe and you are keen to recover while going about daily life, an outpatient programme might be the perfect choice for you. But what is outpatient addiction treatment? Moreover, what does it involve and how can you access it? These are questions we will look at in this article.

What to Expect from Outpatient Treatment?

If you have been wondering what outpatient addiction treatment is, we should tell you that it is regularly provided free of charge by the NHS, charities, and local support groups. You can also access local private counsellors, but you will be expected to cover the cost yourself.

While outpatient programmes vary widely depending on the provider, they are in general much less intensive than inpatient programmes. As you will attend far fewer treatment hours per week, you can expect the duration of an outpatient programme to be much longer than an inpatient programme.

You will not spend the night in the clinic but will instead attend regular treatments with a counsellor or therapist and return home after each session. Outpatient programmes are therefore ideal for those with commitments at home or work.

What Happens During Outpatient Treatment?

Ideally, an outpatient programme will begin once you are clean and sober, meaning you will need to complete a detox before you start. You need to have a clear mind and body as you will find it hard to concentrate on your recovery programme otherwise.

Before starting on a programme of outpatient treatment, you will be given an assessment or evaluation, which will include an interview, to find out more about your current situation, your history of substance use, and whether you have ever tried to quit before.

You might be given a physical examination by a doctor to determine if you have any illnesses related to your substance use. This could include things like a urine and blood tests.

Once accepted, you can expect your outpatient treatment programme to comprise:

  • regular meetings with a doctor
  • regular counselling and therapy sessions either on a one-to-one basis or in a group setting
  • regular urine testing to ensure you are staying clean and sober
  • recovery materials that will help you gain a greater understanding of your illness
  • an introduction to fellowship support groups such as AA or NA.

What Are Fellowship Support Groups?

Fellowship support groups have been helping individuals to overcome addictions to mood-altering substances such as alcohol and drugs for decades. Since Alcoholics Anonymous was established in the early 1930s, these groups have evolved and been adapted for various substance addictions and behavioural disorders.

The basic principle of fellowship support groups is that addiction can be overcome and sobriety maintained with regular meetings, where stories and experiences are shared among members.

Fellowships support groups follow the twelve steps, specifically adapted depending on the organisation. These steps are split into three groups – the decision steps, the action steps, and the maintenance steps.

Working through the twelve steps is not a requirement, although it will help you to get more from the programme. Furthermore, when you consider that AA alone has helped millions of people to overcome their addiction in the years since its inception, it is clear to see that following the steps works. Consider also the fact that the basic principle of AA has been adapted to various other substances such as various drugs and related substances, and behavioural issues such as gambling and sex addictions. This proves that as a method of addiction recovery fellowship support groups work.

What to Expect from Fellowship Support Groups

The question of ‘what is outpatient addiction treatment?’ is one that is commonly asked, but many individuals do not realise that fellowship support groups can be a key part of outpatient recovery. In fact, not including a fellowship support programme in your recovery could increase your chances of a relapse at a later date. Some people manage to get sober with a 12-step programme and nothing else, whereas others will incorporate it into a comprehensive recovery programme.

With so many positive reasons to get involved in a fellowship support group, there are still many individuals who prefer not to join one. This often has to do with the fact that they have misconceptions about these groups.

For example, many people believe that you must belong to a particular religion to join the likes of AA or NA. Others are afraid that they will be put on show and made to stand up and speak about their innermost secrets at their very first meeting. This is not the case.

Mutual support groups are not affiliated with any particular religion. In fact, you do not have to be religious at all to join one. This misunderstanding stems from some of the twelve steps that do refer to God or a Higher Power. The reality is that God can be whatever you define it to be and your Higher Power can be anything that you believe is helping you to get sober and stay that way. You might believe in a greater force or perhaps it is the love you feel for your family that is propelling you towards a successful outcome.

In terms of having to stand up and be on show, this is incorrect also. Nobody will ever force you to talk at a fellowship support meeting if you are uncomfortable doing so. You might be asked to introduce yourself, but you can choose to pass if you wish.

You can simply attend and listen to what others have to say. You will probably find that you can relate to much of what is being said. You can learn from the mistakes of others as well as get helpful advice on how to progress in recovery.

What Will a Fellowship Support Group Mean for You?

If you decide to incorporate a fellowship support group into your recovery programme, you will see many benefits. You will have a place where you can go to meet other recovering addicts. With all members at different stages of their recovery journeys, you will have the opportunity to see what is possible if you stick with it. As you progress through your journey, you will see how far you have come when new members join.

Fellowship groups are supportive environments where you will not have to fear recrimination or judgement and where you can be completely open and honest with yourself and others. Members will be from all walks of life. Some will be just like you and have similar backgrounds, whereas you might not have anything other than addiction in common with others. You will have the chance to make new friendships and you may get to the point where you see your group as a second family.

Fellowship meetings will give you the chance to learn more about how to live successfully in recovery and will be a place of comfort and support whenever you need it. You can get involved with activities and socialise with other members without the worry of chemical substances.

How to Access Outpatient Addiction Treatment?

With so many options for outpatient addiction treatment, you might be feeling a bit overwhelmed. Don’t be though – you can access fellowship support groups within your local community and your doctor will be able to give you information.

You can also get in touch with us here at Primrose Lodge for information about fellowship groups and how to access them or for information on our programmes. We will answer any queries that you may have about addiction and how to overcome it. Call today to find out how we can help you.

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Call Now 0203 553 9263

Call Now 0203 553 9263

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    Guildford
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